Paulina Lucio Maymon

The Project

Paulina (she/her/hers) will advocate on behalf of incarcerated people in Georgia who were sentenced to life in prison as children through direct representation in parole proceedings, education, and policy reform.

In Georgia, more than 600 people are serving life sentences for crimes they committed as children—some as young as 13 years old. 78% of these individuals are Black. Each is supposed to receive a meaningful opportunity for parole, but they do not. Parole applicants in Georgia have no legal right to appear before the State Board of Pardons and Paroles. They have no right to counsel, present evidence, call expert witnesses, or even access their parole files.

Having a parole lawyer in Georgia is critical. A lawyer is able to submit a written advocacy packet to the Board, which tells the story of who that child has become in the past decades. Without this advocacy, people serving life sentences since childhood will have little to no opportunity to obtain release, as the Board will continue to make decisions based primarily on the Department of Corrections paperwork, which is often incomplete and deficient. Such paperwork certainly does not show who these children were, who they have become, and the community support they would have if paroled.

Fellowship Plans

During the Fellowship, Paulina will provide parole representation for people serving life sentences for crimes that occurred when they were children and assist those clients who are granted parole with their reentry into society. She will also train other lawyers and student lawyers on parole representation in Georgia and create a Georgia Juvenile Parole Handbook. Finally, with the help of the Southern Center for Human Right’s policy experts, she will draft model legislation to reform parole proceedings for individuals serving life sentences since childhood in Georgia.

Media

Greenberg Traurig Names its 2022 Equal Justice Works Fellows

Because I refuse to live in a society that gives up on children, I will fight to ensure that people serving life sentences since childhood have a meaningful opportunity to obtain release. Having a real shot at parole is especially important in the Deep South, where the legal system is plagued by systemic racism and overcriminalization.

Paulina Lucio Maymon /
2022 Equal Justice Works Fellow

The Project

Caitlin will provide civil legal services to elderly individuals who have experienced abuse, neglect, or exploitation. Additionally, she will increase awareness and training in identifying and addressing the issue of elder abuse throughout Northwest Texas.

As the senior citizen population rapidly grows, it is critical to expand awareness and legal services to rural areas where vulnerable populations are often isolated, increasing the likelihood of some form of abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Since high school, Caitlin has been passionate about the disability rights movement. She has seen firsthand how a label or diagnosis too often leads to an assumption of incapacity and deprivation of civil rights and liberties.

Fellowship Plans

Caitlin will conduct in-depth research to identify the forms of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation prevalent in Lubbock and in rural communities throughout Northwest Texas. She will reach out to work with local non-profits and organizations which serve senior citizens in the community and conduct community education events. In addition, she will conduct trainings for other professionals and organizations to be aware of and report any signs of elder abuse or exploitation. Throughout the Fellowship, Caitlin will provide direct legal services through screenings, brief service/legal advice, and full-scope representation in civil cases for elderly victims of abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Media

Supporting Fellowships that Help Older Survivors of Domestic Violence Regain Agency Over Their Lives

The Project

Brian’s Fellowship provided high-quality legal assistance and advocacy for Asian Pacific Islander (API) individuals in the sex and labor industry who are victims of trafficking. He assisted them through legal means to protect them, their rights, & their families from those who want to take advantage of them, including recruiters, perpetrators, and traffickers. Brian provided robust, efficient brief Counsel and Advice services and Referrals to appropriate legal and social services for trafficking victims in the API community. He performed community outreach activities and training for interpreters and pro bono attorneys to serve the Asian Pacific Islander community on trafficking issues and remedies. 

Brian has previous experience in immigration law from a clinical setting, trial advocacy skills, and a passion for anti-trafficking efforts. As an Asian minority and LGBT, he understands the elements of vulnerability than can cause potential victims to be affected by exploitation and trafficking. Importantly, his career goal and passion are to build infrastructure and advocate for trafficking victims. 

The Inspiration

The Inspiration

The Project

The goal of my project is to empower survivors of domestic violence to transition out of dependency and victimization through better access to civil restitution, employment opportunities, and public benefits. My project will include litigation and advocacy components focused on expanding the use of monetary remedies in civil protection orders, enforcing the rights of survivors in the workplace, and ensuring access to appropriate public benefits.

The Inspiration

The Project

Munmeeth provided direct legal services to low-income clients in the area of immigration law. Munmeeth assisted victims of domestic violence, human trafficking and other serious crimes to gain lawful nonimmigrant status through T and U visas or petition for lawful permanent resident status under the Violence Against Women’s Act (VAWA). Additionally, Munmeeth spent time managing and involving law students with the Public Law Center’s Family Advocates Legal clinics.

The Inspiration

The Project

I am developing a pilot program with the DC Child and Family Services Agency to identify children in the foster care system who may be eligible for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS). I will be screening foster children for SIJS eligibility and training CFSA staff members to assess SIJS eligibility themselves. I will be directly representing some of the eligible children in family and immigration court proceedings, and establishing and training attorneys willing to represent such children on a pro bono basis.

The Inspiration