Andrew Thomas

The Project

Justice at Work (formerly Friends of Farmworkers) supports low-wage workers as they pursue economic and social justice.   Andrew’s project did this through the provision of free civil legal services to workers throughout Pennsylvania, including those in industries that rely heavily on seasonal foreign guest workers who often return to work for the same Pennsylvania employers each year. 

Andrew brought almost five years of federal court experience to the Crime Victims Justice Corps. After graduating Order of the Coif from Temple University Beasley School of Law, Andrew served as a law clerk to the Honorable David R. Strawbridge in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, as a law clerk to the Honorable Mitchell S. Goldberg in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, and as a staff attorney in the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. 

Andrew also brought to the Fellowship a passion for working with immigrant communities. Before attending law school, Andrew worked for several years in New York City as an immigration law paralegal, both at a small immigration law firm and in the Refugee Protection Program at Human Rights First. 

Andrew put his federal court and immigration law experience to good use during the Fellowship as he worked to improve the lives and working conditions of his clients. Among other projects he worked on, he was involved in federal court litigation on behalf of a group of low-wage migrant workers to recover unpaid wages and other damages from their former employer, including for race and national-origin discrimination. 

The Inspiration

The Inspiration

The Project

Abby improved the economic well-being of low-income immigrants who are struggling to make ends meet during these difficult times. This population faces barriers to accessing and retaining government benefits for a variety of reasons, including type of employment, complex laws concerning immigrant eligibility for public benefits and language barriers. Abby represented low-wage immigrant workers and their families in the areas of access to food stamps, public health insurance, subsidized childcare and public assistance. Abby conducted outreach and clinics providing education to individuals and organizations in this area to ensure proper access to benefits.

The Inspiration

The Project

As an Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Legal Fellow at Community Legal Services, I will be doing a great deal of mortgage foreclosure defense litigation. My focus will be on recovering homes and restructuring mortgage notes due to such factors as subprime lending, high unemployment rates, and foreclosure rescue scams.

The Inspiration

The Project

I work to prevent the homelessness of domestic violence victims living in subsidized housing. Domestic violence victims living in subsidized housing are particularly vulnerable to homelessness because they lack financial means to find and maintain private housing.  This occurs when they are refused admission to, leave to escape abuse, or are evicted from subsidized housing. I am developing strategies and materials for legal representation, advocacy and outreach under the Violence Against Women Act, which can be replicated nationally.

The Inspiration

The Inspiration

The Project

Increase protection of migrant youth in the United States with a focus on compliance with domestic and international law, detention conditions and adequate screening for trafficking or other abuse.

To address this need this project will undertake investigative research and documentation of the conditions of facilities where migrant children are held. The findings and additional research will be used to create recommendations and advocate for change with DHS and Congress.

The Inspiration