Maryam Emory

The Project

Maryam (she/her/hers) will provide direct legal services and outreach to bridge the widening health and education disparity gaps facing Black and Latinx children in Washington, D.C., who have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 infection rates and hospitalizations have been higher among Black and Latinx children and those with a lower socioeconomic status in Washington, D.C. Since the pandemic began, existing health and education disparity gaps facing Black and Latinx children have only widened. The pandemic has significantly impacted children and their families through COVID-related trauma, inability to access education, lack of access to mental health services, problems accessing public benefits, and increased housing conditions issues. These barriers are intensified for Spanish-speaking families who did not receive outreach in their language and were unaware of pertinent information to access educational devices or virtual learning.

Maryam’s commitment to health equity and advocacy is rooted in her personal and professional experiences in the U.S. and abroad. She is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and has held law clerk positions in Medical-Legal Partnerships. She was born in Washington, D.C., and believes that her experiences, paired with her passion for health equity, have well prepared her for this work.

Fellowship Plans 

Maryam will collaborate with impacted families and Children’s Law Center’s medical partners to ensure the most critical legal concerns are identified and addressed in a culturally sensitive manner. She will provide direct legal representation to Black and Latinx children and their families in matters relating to public benefits, obtaining timely education evaluations, language access laws, and housing conditions. She will also create a toolkit dedicated to identifying and addressing intensified legal needs triggered by COVID-19 as a sustainable resource to be utilized by stakeholders across the D.C. area.

Media

2021 Greenberg Traurig Equal Justice Works Law Fellows to Tackle Racial, Economic, and Social Justice Issues

I have seen the devastation the pandemic has had on Black and Latinx communities. As a Black woman committed to health equity, I must do my part in changing the trajectory of this pandemic’s impact on communities to which I am connected.

Maryam Emory /
2021 Equal Justice Works Fellow

The Project

Ashley created a legal clinic for survivors of domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault, and stalking who seek Civil Protection Orders in Washington, DC.

Over 5,500 Civil Protection Order cases are filed in Washington, DC each year. Unfortunately, the majority of individuals seeking protection cannot afford to hire an attorney. Pro se litigants may not know how to accomplish tasks that may be simple for an attorney, such as requesting a new hearing date, completing service of process, amending pleadings, or introducing evidence at trial. An attorney providing brief services and legal advice can help these survivors obtain much-needed protection from their abusers.

Fellowship Highlights

Through her Fellowship, Ashley established the Domestic Violence Protection Order Clinic in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Ashley provided more than 400 clients with brief services through the clinic. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the clinic transitioned into a virtual model, which succeeded in reaching and assisting hundreds of survivors as they attempted to escape violence during the pandemic. Ashley provided more than 50 clients with full representation in Civil Protection Order cases, and many other clients received full representation from DCVLP pro bono attorneys through referrals from the clinic. Through the course of the Fellowship, Ashley recruited and trained over 160 pro bono attorneys. Ashley expanded the reach and impact of her work through publishing three articles on domestic violence issues, appearing on a national television program discussing domestic violence during the pandemic, and presenting as a panelist at the District of Columbia Bench and Bar Conference on how the pandemic reshaped access to justice in the domestic violence context.

Next Steps

Ashley will remain at the DC Volunteer Lawyers Project as a supervising attorney, where she will supervise pro bono attorneys in domestic violence cases and will work to expand DCVLP’s policy and appellate advocacy. Ashley looks forward to maintaining the clinic through the recruitment of pro bono attorneys.

Media

Improving Protections For Immigrant Domestic Abuse Victims

Remote Court Procedures Can Help Domestic Abuse Victims

Tour of D.C. courthouse highlights opportunities to help victims of domestic violence

DC Volunteer Lawyers Project advocating for victims of domestic violence

A Courtroom Conundrum: Protecting Privacy During Remote Hearings

Improving Protections For Immigrant Domestic Abuse Victims

I am dedicated to creating safety and stability for low-income individuals who have been impacted by violence.

Ashley Carter /
Equal Justice Works Fellow

The Inspiration

The Project

The Asian Immigrant Youth Assistance Project aims to provide immigration legal assistance, advocacy and outreach to Asian immigrant youth and their families in the D.C. area through a T, U, and SIJS visa initiative. We intend to work with youth who are abused or abandoned; victims of human trafficking; or victims of crime and can assist in the prosecution of these crimes. The goal is to promote safety, permanency and well being for the community as a whole so that security can be heightened for at-risk populations such as Asian immigrant youth.

The Inspiration

The Project

The Trafficking Asylum Project uses impact litigation to establish asylum eligibility for survivors of human trafficking. While current U.S. law provides a limited form of relief to trafficked persons, gaps in the law allow many to fall through the cracks and remain ineligible for protection. As a result, many survivors will be deported to their country of origin where they may face punishment or re-trafficking. The project also involves workshops for immigration practitioners on litigating trafficking related asylum claims.

The Inspiration

The Project

Increase protection of migrant youth in the United States with a focus on compliance with domestic and international law, detention conditions and adequate screening for trafficking or other abuse.

To address this need this project will undertake investigative research and documentation of the conditions of facilities where migrant children are held. The findings and additional research will be used to create recommendations and advocate for change with DHS and Congress.

The Inspiration

The Project

Corey fought discrimination against aging, low-income people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) or living with HIV/AIDS by overcoming unjust barriers and gaps in health care and empowering those individuals to age safely with dignity and equality.

Aging always brings medical and legal challenges, but those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT), and those who are living with HIV/AIDS, have needs that are greatly compounded. The stereotype that LGBT people are universally affluent is a myth. LGBT people and people living with HIV/AIDS are much more likely than their heterosexual or HIV-negative peers to be poor, childless, and estranged from their families, thus lacking traditional caregivers and advocates. Many must hide who they are to avoid discrimination or abuse. Some lose everything they own due to inequitable treatment under the law. Others are separated from their partners, forced into facilities against their will, and left to die alone. Systemic discrimination has created another challenge to age with dignity and safety for LGBT elders and elders living with HIV/AIDS. The Affordable Care Act’s anti-discrimination provision and a new sensitivity in federal agencies to LGBT and HIV discrimination create an opportunity to transform the aging experience for LGBT elders and elders living with HIV/AIDS.

Fellowship Highlights

During his Fellowship, Corey has:

  • Provided full representation to nearly 200 clients on a variety of matters, including healthcare and end-of-life planning and accessing aging-related benefits and services
  • Launched a Healthcare Planning Clinic to assist clients, particularly those who are LGBT, in completing essential healthcare documents and preparing for future care
  • Worked with the DC government to include LGBT priorities in its plan to make the city better for older adults
  • Participated in a White House summit on LGBT senior housing and submitted briefs to federal agencies urging the inclusion of LGBT older adults in nondiscrimination laws
  • Led or participated in nearly 50 presentations to both LGBT individuals and to advocates working on LGBT or aging issues to advance the rights of LGBT older adults

Where are they now?

Now that the Fellowship is complete, Corey will begin a Zuckerman Fellowship in public interest leadership at Harvard University where he will study health policy issues related to healthcare decision-making and patient autonomy.

The Project

Max will help families in Washington, DC’s rapid re-housing program stay in housing using legal rights trainings, direct representation, and policy advocacy.

The rapid re-housing program has become the DC government’s primary tool for addressing the city’s mounting family homelessness crisis. It is designed to help homeless families move directly back into market-rate housing by providing temporary financial and supportive services. Unfortunately, the program is failing to keep families in stable housing. There are many reasons for this failure, including the placement of families in unaffordable or sub-standard housing, the inadequate provision of supportive services, and the termination of families from the program without a proper basis or notice. With the scale of the program set to more than double this fiscal year, there is an urgent need for coordinated legal and policy advocacy on behalf of the many rapid re-housing families struggling to maintain their housing.

Next Steps

Max currently works as the policy director at Community Spring, an organization he cofounded.

Media

My Impact: A Conversation with 2015 Equal Justice Works Fellow Max Tipping

Advocacy Group Details Shortfalls of Program for D.C.’s Homeless

DC rapid rehousing: In need of improvement, or the end of the road?

Report faults D.C.’s assessment of ‘rapid rehousing’ program

D.C.’s Most Widely-Used Program To Move Homeless Families Into Housing Is Failing, Says Advocacy Group

New Community Spring aims to dismantle poverty