Tahira Bland

The Project

Tahira served indigent clients in a wide variety of legal issues including housing, family, SSI/SSD, unemployment compensation, public benefits, and prisoner re-entry.

The Project

Helena addressed the unmet legal needs of low-income and immigrant working people in Texas who often don’t get paid for their work. Additionally, Helena actively litigate under the Fair Labor Standards Act’s minimum wage and overtime provisions and apply collections remedies that increase the ability of unpaid low-income men and women to fully recover the unpaid wages owed to them.

The Project

Deyanira addressed the legal issues of those affected by Hurricane Ike by recruiting pro bono attorneys and volunteer law students. Additionally, Deyanira assisted low-income Houston residents with their legal issues even if they were not affected by the hurricane.

The Project

Katherine focused on the failure of the criminal justice system to identify and accommodate individuals with developmental disabilities who have been charged with a crime. Focusing first in Alachua County, Florida, Katherine provided education and resources to those working within the criminal justice system and caretakers of people with MR/DD. Additionally, Katherine created an avenue for all involved to communicate their concerns and ideas.

The Project

The Community Development Project of the Urban Justice Center formed in September 2001 to provide legal, technical, research and policy assistance to grassroots community groups engaged in a wide range of community development efforts throughout New York City. My project focuses on providing transactional legal services in collaboration with community-based organizations. This will enable immigrant and low-wage workers, especially in the Bronx, to energize economic opportunities through cooperative enterprise and small business development.

Media

The Project

LFC is an organization dedicated to finding a safe, permanent, loving home for each child it represents by providing them with the highest quality legal and social work services. Laura addressed the immense issues affecting children in foster care who require special education services and, those who may not have disabilities but are still struggling to succeed academically. Through legal advocacy, representation, and outreach, my goal is to ensure LFC clients are afforded the educational services and opportunities they deserve.

The Project

Orleans Parish Prison (OPP) suffers from chronic overcrowding giving rise to conditions that breed rampant infectious diseases. In OPP, even the healthy are at risk for contracting incapacitating and deadly diseases. Elizabeth advocated for the medical needs of clients. In raising awareness of the dangerous conditions at OPP, the project will also lay another plank in the efforts to reduce the size of OPP.

The Project

Anya provided appellate representation for low-income New Yorkers and their children seeking to appeal from Family Court to – or defending against an appeal in – the New York Appellate Division. Through such selective appeals, we aim to establish valuable legal precedent and a “culture of appeals” to better access legislative protections. After gaining trial-level experience in Family Court, Anya represented domestic violence victims on appeal, help train other trial and appellate attorneys and establish an appellate counsel electronic brief bank.

The Project

Kaitlin advocated for D.C. public school students facing suspension or expulsion. The project provided holistic services with direct legal representation, community education, and systemic reforms. The primary goal of this project was to provide representation to students facing disciplinary action through a network of private attorneys and law students.

The Project

Marissa combatted the civil hardships that accompany criminal proceedings in the areas of employment and housing. Additionally, Marissa addressed the unreliability of the criminal record system in Georgia. Continuing to punish those reentering society after criminal justice encounters calls into question principles of fundamental fairness. It can also compromise public safety and contribute to a cycle of crime because those denied opportunities to better their lives often resort to criminal activity.