Leigh Ferrin

The Project

Leigh developed the bankruptcy practice at the Public Law Center. The aim was to aid low-income clients, including filing for bankruptcy, developing foreclosure prevention, and encouraging local law students and attorneys to become involved.

The Project

Elizabeth worked with Montana Legal Services Association in their Housing Law Unit to address the housing issues of low-income clients. Elizabeth provided training for law students and pro bono attorneys who wanted to get involved. Additionally, Elizabeth provided direct services to MLSA’s housing clients, by giving legal advice through MLSA’s Helpline; working with pro se clients through MLSA’s Self-Help Law Project; and directly representing clients in housing cases.

The Project

Esther provided legal services to help homeowners avoid foreclosure, modify loans, and obtain other relief. The short-term goal was to build capacity at the host organization and work with other nonprofit organizations to build a stronger network of services addressing the current foreclosure crisis. The long-term goal was to address institutional and systemic problems within the mortgage industry, including predatory and discriminatory lending practices.

The Project

Rebeca assisted low-income residents of Orange County with family law issues. Rebeca’s cases involved domestic violence prevention, dissolutions, paternities, custody and visitation, guardianships and limited conservatorships. While working at The Family Law Project, Rebeca provided direct legal services and community clinics, collaborated with community organizations and facilitated pro bono case placements.

The Project

Julia Martin created and facilitated pro bono opportunities for law students and lawyers in order to provide essential legal services in underrepresented communities.

Media

The Project

"The goal of the medical-legal partnership is to facilitate legal triage and access for hundreds of vulnerable families whose health or medical conditions are threatened by their overwhelming legal needs. Katrina dramatically changed the lives of New Orleans citizens. Three years later, people are dealing with a combination of environmental issues and stresses that complicate the overwhelmed health care system's attempts to address the patients' health care needs." (source – NOLAC)

The Inspiration

The Project

My project, entitled the Mental Health Legal Services Project (MHLSP), will provide direct legal services to mentally ill, indigent residents of West Contra Costa County. I will collaborate with County Mental Health programs in West Contra Costa County and work closely with mental health providers to ensure project services both respond to clients’ legal needs and contribute to their mental health recovery.

The Inspiration

The Project

Many states have passed laws limiting workers’ rights. At their core is E-Verify, a federal program intended to “authorize” workers but actually restricts workers and immigrants from working while facilitating employer discrimination. Through outreach and education in collaboration with immigrants’ and workers rights groups and business associations, as well as multi-state litigation and policy advocacy, Vivek changed these laws through as-applied challenges to protect the rights of all workers.

The Project

Parisa fought for affordable housing for low-income workers and their families in the Bay Area. California has enacted climate-change laws mandating decreased carbon emissions and higher density land-use. These laws present both a danger that low-income voices will be excluded from the table and a distinct opportunity to promote housing equity. Through coalition building, state policy advocacy, and local administrative and legal action, Parisa leveraged climate-change laws to secure greater workforce housing near quality jobs and public transit.

Media

Job Site Indeed Pledges $10M to Aid Job Seekers Facing Employment Barriers

William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law Alumni Feature

The Project

Appeal for Youth, seeks reform in Georgia through the holistic appellate representation of youthful offenders in our juvenile and criminal justice systems. By increasing the number of appeals from adjudications of delinquency, we hope to end the unwritten policies and practices that result in youths being sent to juvenile detention facilities. Similarly, by providing post-conviction representation to youths who were tried and convicted as adults, we hope to decrease the number of youthful offenders who languish in Georgia’s prisons.