2022 Equal Justice Works Fall Events Highlights

Each fall, Equal Justice Works hosts a series of events for our community—Fellows, alumni, law students, sponsors, and law school professionals—to build their skills, enhance their understanding of our mission, and expand their networks. This year we hosted the Conference and Career Fair for law students, law school professionals, and public interest employers; the Scales of Justice, our annual fundraiser; and our multi-day Leadership Development Training for our Fellows.

This year, the Conference and Career Fair was split into two separate events, allowing participants to take full advantage of the opportunities for networking, learning, and interviewing. From September 21–23, the Equal Justice Works Conference kicked off our 2022 event season with a series of 13 virtual panel discussions. Over three days, we welcomed more than 3,800 attendees to the Conference, and facilitated over 4,200 virtual interviews and 800 table talk meetings, which included issue-specific seminars and information sessions on our programs.

On October 11, we welcomed over 600 attendees, including Fellows, supporters, and law professionals, to Washington, D.C., for the Scales of Justice, our first in-person event since 2019. This annual fundraiser allowed our community to come together and hear from a series of speakers as we recognized this year’s honoree, Teresa Wynn Roseborough of The Home Depot, with the Scales of Justice award.

Emcees Michel and Billy Martin hosted the show, setting the stage for speakers such as the new CEO of Equal Justice Works, Verna Williams. Our speakers included Ivan Fong, chair of the Equal Justice Works Board of Directors and executive vice president, general counsel, and secretary of Medtronic; Ernest LaMont Greer, Equal Justice Works board member and managing partner of Greenberg Traurig, LLP; and Mark Wasserman, member of the Equal Justice Works Board of Counselors and managing partner and co-chief executive officer of Eversheds Sutherland.

The program featured 2022 Text-to-Give Fellow Alexandra Zaretsky, 2021 Fellow Joey Carrillo, and a fireside chat-style video featuring 2012 Fellow Hillary Schneller and 2021 Fellow Ndome Essoka, discussing the intersection of reproductive rights and maternal health.

From October 17–19, Equal Justice Works hosted our virtual Leadership Development Training for Fellows to network and grow their skills through a series of sessions led by Fellow alumni and other legal professionals. Verna Williams, the new CEO of Equal Justice Works, kicked things off by sharing her ideas and vision for the organization moving forward.

Screenshot of the group Zoom screen with the 2022 Leadership Development Training attendees
Screenshot of the 2022 Leadership Development Training attendees in the virtual welcome webinar.

Throughout the event, Fellows heard from a number of distinguished professionals, such as Mónica Ramírez Almadani, President and CEO of Public Counsel; and Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League and Equal Justice Works board member. Fellows also had the chance to attend affinity group sessions based on their interests and project backgrounds, where they could learn about their issue area and discuss intersecting problems with like-minded colleagues.

Closing out the 2022 event season was the Equal Justice Works Career Fair, held virtually from October 20-22. Thanks to the broad accessibility of the virtual format, a record 3,000+ attendees logged on to the event this year! Students met with 243 employers from across the country, offering over 400 available jobs.

Equal Justice Works is incredibly grateful to have such a dedicated and wonderful community that is passionate about our mission and expanding access to justice. We want to thank all participants and attendees for your time and support that made this year’s fall events successful for our organization.

See you in 2023!

On October 11th, 2022, Equal Justice Works gathered hundreds of leaders and supporters from the legal community for the first in-person Scales of Justice since 2019. This year’s event gathered our community of Fellows, Alumni, and supporters in Washington, D.C., to support our mission and to honor Teresa Wynn Roseborough, Executive Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary at The Home Depot.

Thanks to generous event sponsors and donors, we raised more than $2.9 million to support our efforts to mobilize a community of lawyers committed to public service and equal justice! 

This was a landmark year for Equal Justice Works and the Scales of Justice event, as we introduced our new CEO, Verna Williams, to our community for the first time in person. During her remarks, Verna touched on what drew her to Equal Justice Works and the recent successes of the organization. She also shared her vision for the future of Equal Justice Works: “Looking forward, I see great opportunity ahead for this organization and the communities we serve.”

During the program, we highlighted the incredible work of our Fellows, including 2021 Fellow Joey Carrillo’s work, which provides identity-affirming legal services, outreach, and education for low-income LGBTQ+ survivors of domestic violence in Chicago. Joey also spoke at the event, and shared stories from his clients who benefit directly from the services that he provides through his Fellowship. Joey’s project is sponsored by Greenberg Traurig, and he invited Ernest LaMont Greer, the co-president of Greenberg Traurig and Equal Justice Works board member, to the stage to share that as of this spring, Greenberg Traurig will have sponsored 200 Fellows with Equal Justice Works!

Our 2022 Text-to-Give Fellow, Alexandra Zaretsky, took the stage to discuss her project reuniting refugee families by exposing and challenging anti-Muslim immigration policies. In response, attendees texted in donations totaling more than $76,000 to fund one more 2023 Fellow who will pursue their passion to help individuals and communities in need.

We also shared a video in conversation 2012 Fellow alumni Hillary Schneller and 2021 Fellow Ndome Essoka, who discussed their important work advocating for reproductive justice and maternal health care. In this fireside chat, Hillary and Ndome spoke to the recent developments challenging reproductive rights and other intersecting issues, such as maternal healthcare.

During the award presentation, Teresa was introduced by her long-time colleague from Eversheds Sutherland, Mark Wasserman. She then took the stage to speak about the importance of public interest work in achieving justice. During her remarks, she touched on some of the incredible work that our Fellows do to advocate for their causes. She cited projects that focus on youth with behavioral and mental needs;  aim to stop the solitary confinement of children in Georgia’s prisons; and help people navigate complicated property laws, such as Heirs’ law, to ensure that generational wealth is passed down. She also discussed the importance of using the law as a tool of empowerment to create equal access to justice for all.

Teresa stated in her remarks that, “No single person… can fix the tremendous problems before us. None of us alone can do the great things that need to be done to make our country and our world what they were intended to be. But if each of us will simply bite off what we can chew, I believe we can achieve equal justice for all.”

The program was rounded out with special appearances from General Counsel and Secretary, Medtronic, Inc., Ivan Fong; Managing Partner and Co-Chief Executive Officer of Eversheds Sutherland LLP, Mark Wasserman; and co-president of Greenberg Traurig, LLP Ernest LaMont Greer. The 2022 Scales of Justice event was co-hosted by emcees Michel Martin, Weekend Host of All Things Considered and Consider This from NPR, and Billy Martin, Partner at Barnes & Thornburg.

Huge thanks to everyone who made this program possible: Champion of Justice sponsors The Home Depot and Greenberg Traurig, LLP, our other incredible event sponsors, the 2022 Steering Committee, and all who attended and supported The Scales of Justice!

The generosity and dedication of our community is greatly appreciated and will help to bring us closer to fulfilling our nation’s promise of equal justice for all.

If each of us will simply bite off what we can chew, I believe we can achieve equal justice for all.”

Teresa Wynn Roseborough /
2022 Scales of Justice Honoree

Each fall, Equal Justice Works hosts its annual Conference and Career Fair, the largest national public interest legal career fair that brings together hundreds of law students, recent graduates, public interest employers, law school faculty and staff, and public interest practitioners from across the United States and its territories for prescheduled interviews, informal “table talk” discussions, networking opportunities, and panel sessions on contemporary public interest topics.

This year, we are excited to announce a new format for the 2022 Conference and Career Fair that will ensure greater accessibility and inclusivity for our attendees. For the first time ever, Equal Justice Works will split up the event, with the conference and career fair portions taking place over two separate dates.

The conference will take place on September 21 – 23, and the career fair will follow one month later on October 20 – 22. Both parts of the event will be held virtually once again.

The decision to host the Conference and Career Fair over separate dates will give law students the opportunity to maximize their experience and participate in all aspects of the event, as panel sessions will no longer overlap with prescheduled interviews and meet and greets with employers. Additionally, the new format will give space within the conference for law school professionals to network with their colleagues and attend exclusive sessions on the benefits of Equal Justice Works membership and how to best advise students on the Equal Justice Works Fellowship process, among other things.

The Conference and Career Fair will still require a single registration, with early bird employer registration opening on June 13 and law student and law school professional registration opening on August 11. Equal Justice Works will offer informational webinars and other trainings over the summer to help attendees prepare for the event.

Visit here for more information about the 2022 Conference and Career Fair. You can also reach out to [email protected] with any questions.

Teresa Wynn Roseborough is Executive Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary at The Home Depot

Photo of Teresa Wynn Roseborough

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 8, 2022—Equal Justice Works, the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, today announced that it will honor Teresa Wynn Roseborough, executive vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary of The Home Depot, at the Scales of Justice event on October 11, 2022.

“Teresa’s enduring commitment to pro bono, work to promote diverse workplaces, and firm belief that the law must be used to promote justice and improve lives, all make her a deserving recipient of this honor, and we are thrilled to celebrate her contributions at this year’s Scales of Justice,” said David Stern, executive director at Equal Justice Works. “She is a leader among general counsel and an outstanding example of how those in the legal profession can connect with and serve the communities where they live and practice law.”

Teresa’s enduring commitment to pro bono, work to promote diverse workplaces, and firm belief that the law must be used to promote justice and improve lives, all make her a deserving recipient of this honor, and we are thrilled to celebrate her contributions at this year’s Scales of Justice.

David Stern /
Executive Director, Equal Justice Works

A supporter of Equal Justice Works for nearly 25 years, Teresa served on its Board of Directors from 1998 to 2006. She has been a member of the organization’s Annual Dinner Steering Committee since 2012, and a member of its Board of Counselors since 2016

Each year, Equal Justice Works presents the Scales of Justice Award to a leader in the legal community who exemplifies a high level of commitment to public service and pro bono; shares the organization’s values of service, community, opportunity, passion, and equal access to justice; has upheld the organization’s mission and vision throughout their career while also supporting the organization; and has set a strong example for how legal professionals can contribute to efforts in the public interest.

“The only way to make the vision of equal justice for all a reality is for people to have equal access to lawyers and our justice system,” said Teresa. “Lawyers are critical players in fulfilling the promise of equal justice for all. Beyond increasing access, we must also work to ensure that the law structurally supports equal justice, and that we dismantle artificial boundaries to our justice system. I am proud to support Equal Justice Works and am honored to be a part of this community.”

The only way to make the vision of equal justice for all a reality is for people to have equal access to lawyers and our justice system.

Teresa Wynn Roseborough /
executive vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary, The Home Depot

At The Home Depot, Teresa has been a leading voice for expanding the company’s pro bono work and commitments related to social equity efforts in the United States. Since 2013, The Home Depot has sponsored six Equal Justice Works Fellows, and today currently cosponsors two Equal Justice Works Fellows with Eversheds Sutherland. Raneem Ashrawi  advocates for Georgia youth with behavioral and mental health needs, and Eliza McDuffie’s Fellowship project focuses on ending the solitary confinement of children in Georgia’s adult prisons.

“Our Fellows have made us all so incredibly proud to be associated with their work and we are grateful for their leadership and service to our home state of Georgia,” said Teresa.

Before joining The Home Depot, Teresa held several positions at MetLife, including senior chief counsel and deputy general counsel, and she was formerly a partner in the firm that is now Eversheds Sutherland. Teresa began her career in public service working as a deputy assistant attorney general for the Department of Justice during the Clinton administration. She also served as a law clerk for Judge James Dickson Phillips of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and for Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court.

Teresa has earned numerous accolades for her leadership and pro bono work, including recognition as one of 25 Influential Black Women in Business by The Network Journal and as one of America’s top Black attorneys by Black Enterprise. She has also served as a public member of the Administrative Conference of the U.S., and a co-chair of the board of directors of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights.  She is presently Chair of the Board of Advisors of the RAND Institute for Civil Justice.

Click here for more information about the Scales of Justice event.

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About Equal Justice Works

Equal Justice Works is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that creates opportunities for lawyers to transform their passion for equal justice into a lifelong commitment to public service. As the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, Equal Justice Works brings together an extensive network of law students, lawyers, nonprofit legal aid organizations, and supporters to promote a lifelong commitment to public service and equal justice.

Contact
Heena Patel
Marketing and Communications Director
Email: [email protected]

Join representatives from Equal Justice Works, The JPB Foundation, and JPMorgan Chase to learn more about the newest iteration of the Equal Justice Works Housing Justice Program.

Virginia is home to five of the top ten evicting large cities in the United States—a housing crisis affecting thousands of tenants across the state who need legal representation. Yet for too many, our justice system is inaccessible.

Since 1993, Equal Justice Works has mobilized more than 250 lawyers and community organizers to combat housing instability. Since the Housing Justice Program was established in 2019, Fellows have provided legal services to individuals and families, advocated for their rights and engaged with community partners to address the systemic barriers contributing to housing instability in Virginia. In 2021, JPMorgan Chase and The JPB Foundation invested a total of $3.75 million to provide Equal Justice Works with the resources to expand the Housing Justice Program from Richmond, VA, to other communities with high eviction rates, such as Hampton Roads. The grants are a part of JPMorgan Chase’s announcement to award $8.6 million to six organizations to help improve household stability.

On Thursday, January 27, 2022, from 10:30–11:30 a.m. ET, join representatives from Equal Justice Works, The JPB Foundation, and JPMorgan Chase to learn more about the newest iteration of the Equal Justice Works Housing Justice Program at this press event

This virtual event will focus on how public-private partnerships help increase capacity of the legal aid community in Virginia, provide legal assistance to low-income families facing eviction, and advocate for policies and practices that protect the rights of tenants. Partnerships between Equal Justice Works and Virginia Poverty Law Center, as well as between Equal Justice Works and program funders The JPB Foundation and JPMorgan Chase will be highlighted as experts discuss short- and long-term solutions to advance equal justice for all.

Speakers include:

  • Hana Hausnerova, Director of Public Programs, Equal Justice Works (Moderator)

  • Annie Greengard, Senior Program Officer, The JPB Foundation

  • Abigail Suarez, Program Officer, Community Development, Global Philanthropy at JPMorgan Chase

  • Laura Dobbs, Staff Attorney, Virginia Poverty Law Center; 2019 Equal Justice Works Fellow

To register for the event, please visit hereFor any media questions or requests, please email [email protected].

Photo of Rochelle McCain

Rochelle McCain, executive director of the professional development office and co-director of the externship program at University of Pittsburgh School of Law, recently chatted with Equal Justice Works about becoming a member of the National Advisory Committee, and her work helping law students cultivate their public service passions. 

Earlier this year, you were selected to serve on the Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee (NAC). What motivated you to apply to join the NAC? How does your work as a law school professional inform your role on the committee?

In my life, I have always sought to do everything with intentionality to positively impact, and for the benefit of, others, not solely myself. To that end, I try to identify opportunities to advance and facilitate support of the public good, committing fully and actively. After years of working in my law school community, I resolved that the timing was right to give back to Equal Justice Works—an organization whose mission I share and that does so much nationally to support generations of public interest leaders.

I hope that my skills and experiences, coupled with the relationships I have developed as a law school professional, can support the organization’s efforts in serving the law school community and law students more broadly. In representing the Mid-Atlantic region, my work as a law school professional deeply informs my role on the NAC. I readily draw upon my expertise and experiences with colleagues, students, and alumni, to provide a perspective that is uniquely attuned to the challenges and opportunities the region encounters within the public interest space.

In your role at University of Pittsburgh School of Law (PittLaw), you counsel students and alumni on all aspects of job searching and career development. What are some of the biggest concerns that your students have expressed about pursuing their public service passions?

Some of the most pressing concerns raised by students stem from the job search process itself. Many often share concerns/uneasiness regarding the process itself of finding a public interest position. In particular, the constraints found inherent in the public interest hiring process versus that of the private sector’s recruiting process are often raised. What further complicates the job search process is that some may be geographically limited or focused on niche interest areas that may be challenging to break into at the onset of their careers, which many perceive as limiting their options. For some, pursuing a public interest career path may be one less taken among their peer group, so they express feelings of isolation, and some even question their ambitions.

In addition, students regularly worry about sustaining meaningful careers while navigating external financial pressures/considerations they face. Recognizing that public interest sector salaries are substantially lower than many private-sector options, many students are conflicted by their very real financial constraints, whether due to familial obligations or student loan debt. While many public interest employers can provide great substantive experiences, some contend with financial constraints that bear out in their ability to offer paid summer opportunities and competitive entry-level attorney salaries. This environment can often make those interested in pursuing the path restricted from doing so. In the wake of continued uncertainty surrounding the future public service loan forgiveness and economic challenges of our times, some contemplate whether their passions are enough to make the pathway a viable option.

What steps can law schools take to remedy those concerns?

Law schools are well-positioned to think creatively about how they can mitigate some of the “pain points” in the public interest job search process for law students. For many, it may simply start with identifying the public interest students and creating a support system/cohort to ensure they are supported to face the unique challenges of a public interest search. In my experience, I have found my students respond well to having information so they can make informed decisions and put a plan in place. To accomplish this, it may require law schools to create resources, seek innovative regional collaborations with other law schools and/or public interest employers, and broader amplification of existing public interest career resources (including PSJD.org and especially Equal Justice Works).

But, not every law school has the financial wherewithal to significantly reduce or eliminate the financial barriers its students face due to a broader operational budgetary concerns. So, law schools may want to think resourcefully about their fundraising strategies and how to include public interest giving, the establishment of summer funding resources, sponsorship of a post-graduate fellowship program, development of a loan repayment assistance program, etc.

Many law schools already strive to support their public interest students but some concerns and challenges may not be easily addressed by individual institutions and may require a concerted effort by the broader profession and industry.

You also manage the judicial clerkship program at Pitt Law. What advice do you share with students who are interested in securing judicial clerkships or exploring government (federal, state, and local) opportunities?

One of the biggest nuggets of advice I share with my students interested in pursuing clerkships and government opportunities is not to self-select out of the process. While students should think intentionally about whether a particular pathway is for them, due to the competitive nature of the process of both, coupled with the extensive applications, some students may be inclined to opt-out despite being highly credentialed and competitive for the role.  Along the same lines, those that overcome the initial desire to opt-out may be discouraged by the process, especially if they experience rejection early on.

While law school is certainly competitive and grades are one of the objective factors by which employers evaluate candidates, many do not base their decisions solely on this factor. I urge students to try to do as well as they can during law school, but that is not limited to academic success. Students can also benefit as well by taking time to build relationships with others in the profession, take advantage of opportunities for experiential learning (clinics, externships, practicums, work experiences in the field, extracurricular activities such as student organizations and trial teams/competitions, pro bono) to round out applications and reflect practice readiness, and communicate with our office and faculty members as we may be in a position to support their aspirations and provide additional guidance.

I can attest to watching students shatter the “glass ceilings” placed upon them and their potential by themselves and others. With some savvy, support, hard work, connections, guidance, and understanding of their expectations and the profession, quite a bit is possible. The search can be a marathon with twists and turns so patience and perseverance is key along with a great support system.

Pitt Law has a pro bono recognition program for law students who engage in significant amounts of public service work, without academic credit or financial compensation. Why is it important for law students to take part in public service activities? What are some ways students can become involved in pro bono work on campus and in the community?

As members of the legal profession, we possess unique skills to advance and benefit the greater good. Pro bono is an obligation of our profession, as stewards of law. The duty is not just one solely owned by students and attorneys within the public interest sector to bear but for us all to share in regardless of our chosen practice pathways. By understanding and leaning into this duty early on, many reduce any apprehension around pro bono engagement and may increase the likelihood of continued pro bono engagement throughout practice.

Pro bono can also provide broader benefits to law students personally. Beyond fulfilling this call, many law students are able dabble and explore a variety of practice areas, gain practical experience and put the skills learned in law school to the test, and work collaboratively with practitioners. Students can see and be involved with “lawyering in action” with real problems, challenges, and consequences.

Students can find various ways to get involved in pro bono work on campus and in the community. Interested students should think about starting small by just committing to the idea. Once they have done so, they can often begin within their law school community. Many law school staff and faculty members are involved directly with pro bono efforts and welcome having students involved, especially if there is no dedicated office or point of contact at the institution to support pro bono. At Pitt Law, one of my colleagues works closely with students and the community to identify service opportunities. Students can also engage in pro bono by galvanizing around issues important to them and addressing areas of direct and immediate need. Organizations like Equal Justice Works can serve as a platform to engage. Additionally, law students can work within law student organizations to engage in established service projects. And broadly, some bar associations have pro bono coordinators or centers that support legal pro bono that may be willing to partner and serve as a nexus between community organizations and students.

To learn more about our National Advisory Committee, visit here.

Pro bono is an obligation of our profession, as stewards of law. The duty is not just one solely owned by students and attorneys within the public interest sector to bear but for us all to share in regardless of our chosen practice pathways.

Photo of Rochelle McCain

By Rochelle McCain, Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee Member. Rochelle is also the executive director of the professional development office and co-director of the externship program at University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

Equal Justice Works will host its annual Conference and Career Fair virtually from October 21-23, 2021. The Conference and Career Fair provides a wonderful experience. Whether it is someone’s first time or someone has previously attended, there is always something to inspire, recognize, and galvanize law students and the public interest legal community. The air is electric; as students move through the conference space (including the virtual space, as was the case last year and will be the case this year) and engage with public interest advocates. I am consistently reenergized each year by participating in events such as the keynote, concurrent sessions, table talks, and formal and informal networking moments the event provides. It is one of the events I look forward to every fall term!

Here’s some advice for law students looking to stand out and maximize their experience at this year’s career fair:

Set the Stage: It is easy to be distracted or disengage while attending a virtual event. Try to carve out dedicated time to immerse yourself in the conference by reducing any distractions. Also, be sure to take time to identify your goals and aims so you can make your time count.

Be Prepared: Take some time to acclimate yourself to the virtual platform well before you need to attend interviews or attend any concurrent sessions/workshops. Try to organize yourself and create a plan for navigating each day. Think about creating a “must do”, “can do”, and “may do” list, so you have options and alternate plans.

Pace Yourself: Virtual engagement, whether interviews or networking, can require significant bandwidth. Take moments to recharge so you can meaningfully connect with employers and benefit from the programming.

Stay Engaged: Make the moments you have with employers and professionals count. Many remember what it was like to be where you are now and have a wealth of information to share. Treat each and every conversation with employers as you would an interviews. Be prepared to quickly market your interest, skills, and experience. Think about and prepare a short pitch for yourself as time will be of the essence.

Follow-up and Follow-through: The Conference and Career Fair can provide a connection or be the start of a broader/greater conversation to come. It will require you to follow up with those you interviewed as well as those you had the pleasure to chat with during the event. Employers may have long days meeting hundreds of students, so taking the time to follow up after an exchange to reinforce your interest or continue the conversation will make you stand out. Create a system to track the employers you’ve submitted your resume to at the fair, so you have a comprehensive list. It’s a good idea to jot down other notes too, right after you speak with each employer. This will help you to stay consistent, in case you land a follow-up interview with the same person. Taking notes will also help you to effectively follow up with a call, email or formal letter.

Be Authentic: Many students try to fit the ideal prototype of what an employer is seeking and can lose themselves in the process. While you want to incorporate everything you have learned to ensure you are presenting professionally, you do not want to completely assume another persona. Many employers can spot this instantaneously. Let your interest, skills, experiences, and personality shine. Remember to be your best professional self, and it will resonate with others.

Visit here to learn more about the 2021 Conference and Career. If you have any questions about the event, feel free to reach out to [email protected].

Looking for more advice on how to prepare for the event? Check out these helpful posts from our law school engagement and advocacy team:

Hundreds of friends and leaders from all corners of the legal community tuned in on October 12, 2021, for the Scales of Justice—a virtual event to support our mission, celebrate the work of our Fellows, and honor Brian Ellis, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Danaher Corporation, with the Scales of Justice Award.

Thanks to generous event sponsors and donors, we raised more than $3.3 million to support our efforts to mobilize a community of lawyers committed to public service and equal justice!

During the program, we highlighted Equal Justice Works Fellow Charlie J. Isaacs and the incredible work he is doing to protect tenants from landlord abuse and discrimination. We also heard from Fellow alumni Antonia Fasanelli, Diego Cartagena, Keegan Warren-Clem, Michael Pope, and Tirien Steinbach, who shared how their Fellowships launched their careers as public service leaders and how they are continuing to make an impact in our communities, our justice system, and our country.

We also heard from our 2021 Text-to-Give Fellow Fernanda Herrera Spieler, who spoke about how her parents’ experience as undocumented workers inspired her to fight for the rights of immigrants and ensure that all workers are equally protected by our justice system. In response, attendees texted in donations totaling more than $85,000 to fund one more 2022 Fellow who will pursue their passion to help people in need. 

A memorable moment in the program occurred when former board member Judge Ann Claire Williams (Ret.) popped in to celebrate two major milestones for Equal Justice Works—executive director David Stern’s 30 years of service, and the organization’s 35th anniversary.

During the program, attendees had the opportunity to watch 2021 Scales of Justice honoree Brian Ellis in conversation with Judge Williams. Brian reflected on his family values; discussed his commitment to pro bono work and diversity, equity, and inclusion; and offered the following advice to Fellows:

“Just keep doing what you’re doing. Keep pushing because without you making a difference, we would be in a difficult place in many spaces. Keep knocking it out of the park. We’re here to support you.”

The program was rounded out with special appearances from Danaher Corporation president and CEO Rainer M. Blair; Equal Justice Works board member and co-president of Greenberg Traurig, LLP, Ernest LaMont Greer; and 2021 Steering Committee member Gregg F. LoCascio, partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

Huge thanks to everyone who made this program possible: Champion of Justice sponsors Danaher Corporation, Greenberg Traurig, LLP, Kirkland & Ellis, Williams & Connolly LLP, and our other incredible event sponsors; the 2021 Steering Committee; and all who attended and supported The Scales of Justice!

Check out the full program here. 

The generosity and dedication of our community is helping to bring us closer to fulfilling our nation’s promise of equal justice for all.

Fellows—Just keep doing what you're doing. Keep pushing because without you making a difference, we would be in a difficult place in many spaces. Keep knocking it out of the park. We're here to support you.

Brian Ellis /
Danaher Corporation Senior Vice President & General Counsel

By Brooke Meckler, director of law school engagement and advocacy at Equal Justice Works

This fall, Equal Justice Works will host its annual Conference and Career Fair virtually from October 21-23, 2021.

The Conference and Career Fair provides a unique opportunity for students to interview with public interest employers from across the country for internships and post-graduate positions. It is also a one-stop shop for career growth for public-service minded law students, with networking opportunities with over 150 employers, résumé reviews, workshops, and panel discussions. Here’s what students need to know to make the most out of this year’s virtual fair.

Test-run everything before the event!

In advance of any virtual interview or career fair, always ensure you are comfortable with the platform being used. This means navigating the system before the event, knowing how to access your interviews and table talk, and testing out your camera and audio. For the Conference and Career Fair, this means you should be familiar with Pathable before the day of the event. Make sure you know how to log in and navigate the platform and app so you can take advantage of all the conference has to offer. Our platform has multiple features that allow you to connect and follow up with employers, which you should learn about prior to the fair. Test-running your experience also allows us to troubleshoot any issues in advance of the event and any interviews you have lined up.

Treat virtual interviews like in-person interviews.

“Arrive” to your virtual interview on time, and dress the way you would if you were meeting with the interviewer in person. Be polite, interested, and friendly to all individuals involved in the process, whether it be the administrator of the event, someone who welcomes you to the interview, or the interviewers themselves. As with any interview, be prepared to talk about anything you included in your application materials. In the event that you have to cancel or reschedule your interview, reach out to our team as soon as possible.

Attend Table Talk and Conference Sessions!

Many students are not taking advantage of table talk events, which means that those who do attend will really stand out with employers. Students should come to table talk knowing some information about the organization and show curiosity and interest. For the Conference and Career Fair, you’ll be taking advantage of the “Talk Now” feature during Table Talk to connect with employers from over 150 organizations! And here’s a hot tip: even if you already have an interview, attend table talk so you can get the inside scoop beforehand. There are also excellent sessions throughout the conference focused on topics like racial justice, housing, immigration, and environmental law. Public interest leaders from across the country serve as panelists and share incredible insights on their practice areas. During this year’s conference, we are excited to invite Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta as our keynote speaker to talk about her inspirational career. You can either join these sessions live, or watch the recordings afterwards if you have an interview during the session.

Visit here to learn more and register for the 2021 Conference and Career. If you have any questions about the event, feel free to reach out to [email protected].

By Kirsten Fruit, senior program manager at Equal Justice Works

This fall, Equal Justice Works will host its annual Conference and Career Fair virtually from October 21-23, 2021.

The Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair is the largest national public interest legal career fair, bringing together hundreds of law students, recent graduates, public interest employers, and law school professionals from across the United States and its territories to participate in prescheduled interviews, attend substantive conference sessions and workshops, and network with peers and colleagues.

Registration for law students and recent graduates is now open! This is an excellent opportunity to build your public interest network and secure either full-time, part-time, or an internship position. Here are some tips and tricks to help you stand out as a candidate at this year’s event:

  • Apply to Multiple Positions. We recommend applying to several positions to increase your chances of being selected for an interview. All interviews will take place virtually throughout the three days of the event—view our registered employers here.
  • Read the Job Posting(s) Carefully. Make sure you read and understand each job posting before applying to ensure that your qualifications and experience are a good match for the role. Meeting all the requirements is not necessary; however, make sure you meet the essential ones before submitting your application.
  • Customize Your Application Materials. It is important to demonstrate that you have done your research on each employer by targeting your application to the job(s) you are applying for. If possible, align your work experience and skills with what is listed in the job description. This is your opportunity to make a great first impression.
  • Check for Spelling and Grammar Mistakes. Read through your application materials multiple times to check for spelling and/or grammatical errors. If time allows, we recommend having a friend, family member, or career counselor proofread your materials before submitting.
  • Polish Your Social Media Accounts. Many hiring managers and recruiters review candidates’ social media accounts, so make sure your public accounts are presentable. With LinkedIn in particular, make sure that there are no inconsistencies between your résumé and your LinkedIn profile.

Visit here to learn more and register for the 2021 Conference and Career. If you have any questions about the event, feel free to reach out to [email protected].