Looking for a Host Organization? We’re here to help.

Applications for the 2023 Design-Your-Own Fellowship are open until 8 p.m. ET on September 13. Visit here for more details about the Fellowship, and to access resources and information about the application process.

The Equal Justice Works Design-Your-Own Fellowship program serves a dual purpose: to jumpstart the careers of aspiring public interest lawyers, and to build crucial capacity at legal services organizations nationwide. Equal Justice Works does not match candidates and their host organizations; instead, both parties collaborate closely to design a project and apply for the Fellowship together. If you are a 2023 Fellowship candidate who does not yet have a host, check out our round-up below for organizations seeking partners. If you are a host organization still seeking prospective Fellows and do not see your solicitation listed here, email us at [email protected] to add or remove your listing.

*Note: this list is not comprehensive, and the postings it shares are subject to change. Please communicate directly with prospective host organizations for up-to-date information on partnership plans. 

  • Death Penalty Information Center | Washington, DC
    • Reporting to the Deputy Director, the fellow will research cutting edge issues in the administration of the death penalty.

  • New York Civil Liberties Union | New York, NY
    • Applicants will be asked to submit ideas for a project proposal relating to civil liberties and civil rights in New York. Proposed projects often combine litigation, advocacy, community outreach, and public education.

  • LatinoJustice PRLDEF | Orlando, FL
    • We are particularly interested in projects that address Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican diaspora; reproductive rights and/or gender justice, including LGBTQ rights; economic justice, including education and housing justice; and the intersection of the immigration and criminal legal systems.

  • International Refugee Assistance Project | New York, NY
    • IRAP seeks fellowship proposals that align with the applicants’ interests, but all fellowship proposals in response to this solicitation must provide assistance to individuals seeking safe refuge in the United States. Applicants are particularly encouraged which focus on Afghans seeking lasting safety in the United States and/or assisting those who have recently crossed or seek to cross the U.S./Mexico border.
  • Human Rights First | New York, NY / Los Angeles, CA
    • Human Rights First is primarily interested in projects that will support our efforts in Los Angeles and New York to advance due process and address systemic impediments to access to counsel and fair proceedings in the legal representation and treatment of asylum-seekers during border processes, asylum office interviews, and immigration court hearings.
  • Local Progress | Washington, DC
    • This is an exciting opportunity for recent law school graduates who are eager to build the legal and policy capacity of the Local Progress network, which is comprised of elected officials serving in cities and counties, and on school boards, as well as closely collaborate with these members in working hand-in-hand with impacted communities to win and defend transformational local policy on some of the most pressing issues facing communities today. 
  • American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU):
    • LGBTQ & HIV Project | New York, NY
      • The ACLU seeks to sponsor a candidate for an externally funded fellowship that would focus on court challenges to anti-trans laws, including laws barring access to gender-affirming health care; restrictions on use of restrooms, locker rooms, or other sex-segregated facilities; laws barring participation by trans youth on sports teams; and legal rules that label parents or care providers as child abusers if they provide gender-affirming care. We are also open to considering other fellowship proposals in the trans justice space.
    • Center for Liberty | New York, NY
      • The Center for Liberty seeks a fellow to address novel and complex legal questions relevant to defending and advancing the rights encompassed by the Center— reproductive freedom, LGBT rights and the rights of people living with HIV, the rights of people with disabilities, women’s rights, and freedom of religion and belief. We are particularly interested in sponsoring a candidate interested in looking at these issues from the lens of systemic equality.

    • Legal Department | New York, NY
      • Reporting to the National Legal Director, the Fellow will be focused on litigating state constitutional rights claims in state supreme courts. In light of the increasingly hostile federal courts, the ACLU will turn to state supreme courts to develop and safeguard constitutional rights.

    • Criminal Law Reform Project | New York, NY
      • CLRP seeks to sponsor a fellow in the New York office to undertake a project combatting policing harm through state constitutions and creative litigation to support investments in alternatives to police responses.

    • Reproductive Freedom Project | New York, NY
      • Specific job duties…will include legal research, litigation, and policy work to support RFP’s efforts to reimagine the right to reproductive freedom.
    • Women’s Rights Project | New York, NY
      • WRP seeks to host an externally funded Legal Fellow to challenge restrictions on women’s economic and social opportunities caused by forms of blacklisting and other procedures that categorically penalize individuals for prior contact with the housing or family regulation systems, such as having an eviction record or appearing on a state child abuse registry.

    • Immigrants’ Rights Project | San Francisco, CA
      • We are particularly interested in advancing work that will advance farmworkers’ and domestic workers’ rights, including access to minimum wage, overtime, and workers’ compensation, and collective bargaining protections.

    • Capital Punishment Project | New York, NY
      • Partnering With ACLU Affiliates In Death Penalty States, And With Coalition Partners Nationally, The Capital Punishment Project Promotes Both Abolition And Systemic Reform Of The Death Penalty Process

    • Voting Rights Project | New York, NY
      • Proposed projects for the Voting Rights Project should have an impact-litigation focus, but successful projects also frequently include an integrated advocacy approach (weaving in policy advocacy, public education, etc.).

    • Disability Rights Program | San Francisco, CA
      • DRP has many projects, ideas, and requests for assistance that could be strengthened or undertaken only with the addition of a fellow, including: guardianship, policing and mental health, and voting.
Photo of Michael J. Harding

Michael J. Harding, a rising third-year law student at Villanova University and a member of both the Equal Justice Works Board of Directors and the National Advisory Committee (NAC), recently chatted with Equal Justice Works about serving on his campus and in the community and how these experiences have helped to set the foundation for his legal career.

You have a clear passion for public interest law as shown by your work on campus at Villanova University and in the community. What inspired you to become a public interest leader?

I always believed that the true reflection of our character is how we treat people living on society’s margins. Bryan Stevenson, my role model and the founder and executive director of Equal Justice Initiative exemplifies this foundational principle through his work. In my view, lawyers like Bryan advance justice by harnessing the law’s immense potential for good. As an aspiring public interest lawyer, I aim to leverage diverse voices to challenge existing power structures and legal frameworks that perpetuate systemic injustices.

One of the ways you serve on your campus is through the Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee. What are some of your responsibilities as a member?

The primary responsibility of a National Advisory Committee (NAC) member is to serve as a link between Equal Justice Works’ Law School Engagement and Advocacy team (LSEA) and our law school communities. In part, this includes sharing the resources and opportunities that Equal Justice Works has to offer with my peers and career service professionals. Further, NAC members report back to Equal Justice Works staff on public interest legal issues, trends, and events happening in our regions. Additionally, we assist Equal Justice Works in planning the annual Conference and Career Fair and select recipients of the Regional Public Interest Awards.

What are some projects and/or initiatives you are working on at your law school? 

I’m launching a new public interest law blog at Villanova University School of Law, where I will serve as its Editor-in-Chief. This blog will function as a student-run online publication where law student writers will concisely analyze and discuss current public interest legal issues and trends. Additionally, it will help promote and coordinate the Anti-Poverty Symposium held at Villanova Law. While the website for the blog is currently being built, it will be up soon so that the incoming staff writers will have a platform to publish their work.

As a public interest leader, you have served as a role model to young Black and brown students. Why is it important to provide law students access to mentors who have experienced similar challenges and difficulties? 

We’ve all seen the disappointing statistics showing how few Black and brown lawyers and law students there are in our profession. The legal profession, including law school, reflects an essential, yet often difficult to attain, vocation. Many Black and brown law students struggle with imposter syndrome while trying to navigate the highly competitive, established, and white-dominated arena in their pursuit of a career in law. As one such student, I have made a concerted effort to connect with mentors who look like me while also reflecting a world full of endless possibilities in the profession.

It’s important for law students, especially those who are first-generation, to have access to mentors who relate to them for several reasons. First, these mentors understand the unique struggles of students and see us for more than grades or rankings. Such a mentorship reminds students why we entered law school and whom we aim to serve once we graduate. Second, these mentors expand the scope of what students believe we can achieve despite the explicit and tacit forces suggesting that we don’t belong. Finally, connecting Black and brown law students to mentors who can relate helps students remember that we can transform our feelings of fear or self-doubt into fuel to persist, overcome, and achieve.

What are some steps law schools can take to better provide career and academic support for Black and brown students? 

Law schools should fund opportunities and programs that recruit, retain, support, and graduate Black and brown law students. It would be helpful for them to publicly advertise and financially support existing programs like The Appellate Project that are designed to provide support for Black and brown students. Law schools should also ask their Black and brown students what specific support they need, collaborate with them to provide it, and then ensure those students’ needs are met on a regular basis. These are just a few examples of many, but I believe they will help Black and brown students thrive in any law school environment.

Last year, you became a member of the Equal Justice Works Board of Directors. How has the experience been so far?

My experience on the Board has been surreal. Go look at the list of members and you’ll see why I feel this way. The list includes general counsels of major companies, chairpersons of Am Law 100 firms, federal circuit court judges, law school deans, President Obama’s former Solicitor General, public interest leaders, and more. It’s been an incredible opportunity to work with and learn from some of the brightest legal minds in the country. As a Board member, I’ve been fortunate to learn the inner workings of a national nonprofit organization, and to assist its mission to mobilize future public service leaders. In short, I’m eternally grateful for this experience and look forward to helping Equal Justice Works thrive in the years ahead.

In what ways have these opportunities—from the National Advisory Committee to the Equal Justice Works Board of Directors—helped to set the foundation for your legal career?

These experiences have reaffirmed my commitment to pursue a career serving those on society’s margins through justice-oriented lawyering and policy making. Moreover, the extraordinary network I’ve cultivated within the NAC and Board will allow me to access opportunities to advance my public interest legal career. Serving in these two groups has been an honor, and I’ll take the lessons I’ve learned with me wherever my career leads me.

Lastly, what advice would you give to law students interested in becoming public interest leaders at their schools but unsure of where to start?

My three pieces of advice are to serve as an Equal Justice Works student representative on your law school campus, to become an Equal Justice Works ambassador and join its National Advisory Committee, and to sign up to volunteer at events hosted by your school’s pro bono society. Whatever you decide to do, get involved. You won’t regret it!

Visit here to learn more about ways that you can serve on your law school campus.

Equal Justice Works, the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, today announced the newest members of its National Advisory Committee.

Formed in 2003, the National Advisory Committee (NAC) is a diverse group of  law students and  law school professionals who serve as Equal Justice Works ambassadors within the law school and legal services communities. NAC members extend the reach of Equal Justice Works initiatives by providing leadership, feedback, and outreach assistance to support the organization’s mission to create opportunities for lawyers to transform their passion for public service into a lifelong commitment to equal justice.

“We are excited to welcome these new members to the National Advisory Committee,” said Aoife Delargy Lowe, vice president of law school engagement & advocacy at Equal Justice Works. “These new NAC members will identify opportunities and provide guidance for how Equal Justice Works can best serve the law student community and law students more broadly.”

NAC members serve two-year staggered terms, and each year we welcome new members to replace those who have completed their terms of service. This year, the Committee welcomes four law students and three law school professionals. The newest members of the 2022-2024 National Advisory Committee include:

Law Students:

  • Bruce Leal, American University Washington College of Law
  • Nicole Jansma, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • Leslie Espiricueta, St. Mary’s University School of Law
NAC 2022-2024 Law Students
Photo of the 2022-2024 National Advisory Committee law student members. (L–R:) Leslie Espiricueta, Bruce Leal, and Nicole Jansma.

Law School Professionals:

  • Marni Lennon, University of Miami School of Law
  • Miguel Willis, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School
  • Huy Nguyen, University of Washington School of Law
NAC 2022-2024 LSP
Photo of the 2022-2024 National Advisory Committee law school professional members. (L–R:) Huy Nguyen, Marni Lennon, Miguel Willis.

 “I am looking forward to serving on the committee because I will have the opportunity to increase the knowledge law students have about public interest work,” said new NAC member Leslie Espiricueta. “Serving underprivileged communities when one has the privilege of a law school education is a very meaningful way to give back and I am hoping to inform law students on how this career field can look.”

 I am looking forward to serving on the committee because I will have the opportunity to increase the knowledge law students have about public interest work.

Leslie Espiricueta /
Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee

The NAC will host its annual meeting virtually on Wednesday, August 10. At the meeting, members will brainstorm how to best expand access and knowledge of public interest law in their respective regions.

For more information about the National Advisory Committee members and to see a current list of members visit here.

Each year, Equal Justice Works partners with the Legal Services Corporation (LSC) for the Rural Summer Legal Corps (RSLC), a program that addresses the pressing legal issues facing rural communities. Program participants, called Student Fellows, spend eight to ten weeks during the summer serving at LSC-funded civil legal aid organizations where they help to provide direct legal services, engage in community outreach and education, and build capacity at host organizations.

This year, 40 Student Fellows from 36 law schools were selected from 333 applications to work remotely at 37 LSC-funded civil legal aid organizations across the United States and its territories, providing critical legal assistance to people in rural areas.

Meet our 2022 RSLC Student Fellows and learn about how they will be helping to address some of the biggest challenges facing rural communities:

Photo of Hannah Atkinson
Photo of Hannah Atkinson

Hannah Atkinson (she/her/hers), Pace University School of Law

At Legal Services of the Hudson Valley, Hannah will help launch a much-needed project to identify with tenants of mobile parks that are at risk of homelessness, have been living in illegal and inhabitable conditions, and have been subjected to other illegal practices.

 

Photo of J.D. Barnes
Photo of J.D. Barnes

John (J.D.) Barnes (he/him/his), University of Oklahoma College of Law

J.D. will develop litigation strategies and a community education program for Legal Aid of Nebraska’s Native American Program, which provides legal services to Native Americans experiencing legal issues in or involved with courts in Nebraska. He will also provide direct legal services to Native Americans residing in communities on or near reservations or in tribal service areas who have legal issues related to housing.

 

Photo of Elise Baroni
Photo of Elise Baroni

Elise Baroni (she/her/hers), University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Leflar Law Center

Hosted at Legal Aid of Arkansas, Inc, Elise will join Beyond Opioids—Breaking Legal Barriers for Families in Recovery—the first collaborative project among legal aid programs focused on people impacted by the opioid crisis and other substance use disorders. There, Elise will help provide direct legal services to low-income Arkansans with Opioid Use Disorder experiencing barriers to treatment and conduct outreach and education in partnership with methadone providers in the underserved Delta Region.

 

Photo of Samantha Beauchamp
Photo of Samantha Beauchamp

Samantha Beauchamp (she/her/hers), Suffolk University Law School

At Legal Assistance of Western New York, Inc (LawNY), Samantha will assist low-income clients in reducing barriers to employment and accessing unemployment insurance benefits. Additionally, Samantha will help LawNY expand its employment-related legal services provided to rural clients, especially to those who are under-or-unemployed due to having a criminal record.

 

Photo of Tara Blackwell
Photo of Tara Blackwell

Tara Blackwell (she/her/hers), Washington and Lee University School of Law

Tara will work with a special initiative at Center for Arkansas Legal Services to reduce generational poverty through home ownership and estate planning. Her work will concentrate on the poorest communities of the Arkansas Delta. As part of this work, Tara will help protect family land through “Wills on Wheels” clinics to prevent title issues before they occur, participate in community outreach, and provide litigation support to staff attorneys at her host organization.

 

Photo of Emily Borbon
Photo of Emily Borbon

Emily Borbon (she/her/hers), Belmont University College of Law

Emily will work with Legal Aid of NorthWest Texas to provide direct legal services, outreach, and community education to underserved populations in Wichita Falls, Texas. She will focus on housing stability and assist in three priority areas: eviction defense/rental assistance cases, debt collection cases, and expunctions and driver’s license restoration cases.

 

Photo of Billy Bradley
Photo of Billy Bradley

William (Billy) Bradley (he/him/his), University of California, Berkeley School of Law

At Legal Services Alabama, Billy will support his host organization’s Rural Economic Improvement Project (REIP), an initiative created to improve access to civil justice and build legal empowerment in rural Alabama communities. As a Student Fellow, Billy will help represent clients, conduct community outreach, and organize hybrid responses targeted to the needs of clients and communities.

 

Photo of Patrick Brogan
Photo of Patrick Brogan

Patrick Brogan (he/him/his), Villanova University School of Law

Hosted at Ohio State Legal Services, Patrick will assist with defending tenants facing eviction and gathering critical information from multiple counties, including court data and documented stories of individuals with disparate eviction outcomes because of their county location. Additionally, Patrick will attend hearings in these courts, take notes and track the outcomes of cases to help determine where future Tenant Advocacy Project clinics or other eviction diversion tools would be beneficial.

 

Photo of Chery Dayleen
Photo of Dayleen Chery

Dayleen Chery (she/her/hers), Southern University Law Center

Dayleen will work with her host organization, Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc, on employment law matters affecting migrant and seasonal agricultural workers. She will assist with negotiations and litigation on current cases, along with intakes and case development for various complaints that the team receives during the summer.

 

Photo of Gabe Cripe
Photo of Gabe Cripe

Gabe Cripe (he/him/his), University of Cincinnati College of Law

At Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati, Gabe will support his host organization’s Kinship Care Team, which assists grandparents and others who are caring for children whose parents cannot raise them due to a variety of issues, including substance use, untreated mental illness, or incarceration. He will assist with outreach, maintenance of referral relationships with partner agencies, brief-service legal clinics and legal advocacy to help clients access public benefits like Medicaid, Food Stamps, and cash payments to support the children they are raising.

 

Photo of Monte Cole
Photo of Monte Cole

Monte Cole (he/him/his), University of Montana School of Law

Hosted by Nevada Legal Services, Monte will work directly with a farmworker rights attorney and an outreach coordinator to provide legal education, access to justice, and investigation and defenses against rights violations of farmworkers. Monte will also help represent clients when necessary and conduct legal research on labor rights issues.

 

Photo of Hannah Davis
Photo of Hannah Davis

Hannah Davis (she/her/hers), Tulane University Law School

Hannah will assist Alaska Legal Services Corporation (ASLC) in efforts to empower communities by increasing knowledge of the legal system and local resources. She will also assist ALSC staff with the Pro Bono Training Academy, which is an online resource that trains non-attorney community advocates to assist clients, and BeneFactor, an app that guides caseworkers through the steps needed to assemble a successful disability application.

 

Photo of Jacob Engelhardt
Photo of Jacob Engelhardt

Jacob Engelhardt (he/him/his), Boston College Law School

Jacob will work with Land of Lincoln Legal Aid to provide outreach, community education, and legal assistance to a growing population of domestic violence survivors who face isolation and economic instability due to the remoteness of rural Illinois which lacks public transportation, childcare, and sometimes even cellphone service. Jacob will also be trained on how to assist and represent these at-risk clients holistically, particularly as these clients often have more than one legal issue at a time.

 

Photo of Rodrigo Fernandez-Ortega
Photo of Rodrigo Fernandez-Ortega

Rodrigo Fernandez-Ortega (he/him/his), Willamette University College of Law

Rodrigo will conduct outreach to low-income housing communities, mobile home parks, and resource centers with his host organization, Legal Aid Services of Oregon. He will also educate tenants about their rights, work with staff attorneys to provide legal representation in eviction cases, collect data about eviction proceedings; and examine the compliance of courts with various rules and statutes meant to protect tenants.

 

Photo of Maiya Fudge
Photo of Maiya Fudge

Maiya Fudge (she/her/hers), University of Florida Levin College of Law

At Legal Service of Greater Miami, Maiya will assist with the Mobile Home Park Advocacy Project which serves mobile home park residents in rural Miami. Through this project, she will help provide access to justice for mobile home park homeowners’ associations, composed of low-income mobile home park owners, in park closure cases and will legally challenge adverse rules, regulation changes, and rent increases.

 

Photo of Cassie Goodnight
Photo of Cassie Goodnight

Cassie Goodnight (she/her/hers), Washington University School of Law

At Oklahoma Indian Legal Services, Cassie will provide legal services through the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Parent Representation Project. She will provide a variety of legal services to parents and families to help enforce the ICWA, which prevents the arbitrary removal of Indian children from their homes.

 

Photo of Andrew Green
Photo of Andrew Green

Andrew Green (he/him/his), Villanova University School of Law

Andrew will work on the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands’  Rural Reentry Outreach & Legal Clinics Project, which provides access to justice for the formerly incarcerated. He will support legal work to assist low-income, rural individuals facing societal barriers due to prior criminal records, providing services such as criminal record expungement, driver’s license reinstatement, and certificates of employability for private employers and state licensing.

 

Photo of Matthew Gulick
Photo of Matthew Gulick

Matthew Gulick (he/him/his), Lewis & Clark Law School

Hosted by Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Matthew will work with the Community Development and Environmental Justice team to ensure that rural communities are not overburdened by air and water pollution, have access to safe drinking water, and are able to fight predatory foreclosure practices by an irrigation district.

 

Photo of Kelsey Gunvalson
Photo of Kelsey Gunvalson

Kelsey Gunvalson (she/her/hers), University of Wisconsin Law School

At Legal Services of Northwest Minnesota Corporation, Kelsey will work on Reach Justice Minnesota, a statewide network of community-based civil justice kiosks and mobile civil legal aid clinics. She will expand the use of the legal kiosk network across northern Minnesota and establish regularly scheduled mobile legal clinics in a variety of court, agency, nonprofit, and other community locations.

 

Photo of Jada Haynes
Photo of Jada Haynes

Jada Haynes, (she/her/hers) Southern University Law Center

Jada will work with host organization Georgia Legal Services Program to assist rural communities of color in securing homeownership and preserving wealth in communities that are most affected by natural disasters. Jada will conduct needs assessments, draft educational materials for high-risk communities, and create training materials for volunteer lawyers to assist with FEMA recovery.

 

Photo of Anna Henson
Photo of Anna Henson

Anna Henson (she/her/hers), Michigan State University College of Law

At Pine Tree Legal Assistance, Inc, Anna will work within the Basic Unit and the Family Law and Victims’ Rights Unit to provide legal services to low-income clients throughout Aroostook County, Maine. She will combine substantive legal work, research projects, community outreach, and a needs assessment to resolve complex legal issues on behalf of more low-income clients.

 

Photo of Millie Hobaish
Photo of Millie Hobaish 

Millie Hobaish (she/her/hers), University of California, Irvine School of Law

Hosted by DNA-Peoples Legal Services, Millie will work with the supervision of Navajo licensed attorneys to provide outreach, community legal education, and a full spectrum of legal assistance to residents in the Navajo communities.

 

Photo of Hannah Holmberg
Photo of Hannah Holmberg

Hannah Holmberg (she/her/hers), University of St. Thomas School of Law

At Legal Services of Northwest Minnesota Corporation, Hannah will work on Reach Justice Minnesota, a statewide network of community-based civil justice kiosks and mobile civil legal aid clinics. She will expand the use of the legal kiosk network across northern Minnesota and establish regularly scheduled mobile legal clinics in a variety of court, agency, nonprofit, and other community locations.

 

Photo of Christopher Irsfeld
Photo of Christopher Irsfeld

Christopher Irsfeld (he/him/his), New York University School of Law

Christopher will address legal issues affecting rural transgender and gender-non-conforming Californians while working at his host organization, California Rural Legal Assistance. He will work with the LGBTQ+ Program to investigate potential harassment and discrimination claims and provide direct legal services in areas such as identity-document updates, immigration, employment, housing, healthcare access, and education.

 

Photo of Paige Kendrick
Photo of Paige Kendrick

Paige Kendrick, (she/her/hers), Washington University School of Law

Hosted by North Penn Legal Services, Paige will provide outreach, community education, and representation in rural counties which have significant needs in housing, debt, and consumer matters. Paige will also conduct outreach, create networking opportunities, and use legal information to educate communities.

 

Photo of Haley Klima
Photo of Haley Klima

Haley Kilma, (she/her/hers), University of Mississippi School of Law

At North Mississippi Rural Legal Services, Haley will provide free tax representation for increased numbers of low-income taxpayers who cannot afford to pay private attorneys to address their tax problems. Haley will also expand efforts to reach taxpayers through education and outreach in various Mississippi communities and raise awareness of available resources and clinics.

 

Photo of Robert Lass
Photo of Robert Lass

Robert Lass (he/him/his), University of Missouri School of Law

Robert will help Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, Inc. expand outreach efforts in rural counties and increase their capacity, mainly in serving domestic violence victims living in rural northeastern Missouri. Robert will work with mentors to conduct intake screenings, interview clients, draft pleadings, manage dockets, appear in court, and assist with case closeout, primarily for domestic violence cases.

 

Photo of Maya Madden
Photo of Maya Madden

Maya Madden (she/her/hers), Texas A&M University School of Law

Hosted by Lone Star Legal Aid, Maya will implement the Homestead and Disability Property Tax Exemption project for low-income residents of rural Texas. She will conduct community outreach and education, provide legal counsel, and help represent clients who need guidance securing tax exemptions or are fighting for the return of their homes after unjust tax foreclosure lawsuits led to home loss.

 

Photo of Olivia Marks
Photo of Olivia Marks

Olivia Marks (she/her/hers), Tulane University Law School

At Southeast Louisiana Legal Services Corporation, Olivia will focus largely on ensuring that communities impacted by Hurricane Ida throughout rural parishes have access to justice and are not left behind in the recovery process. She will provide legal services to help these individuals recover after disasters and will provide significant outreach.

 

Photo of Robert Necciai
Photo of Robert Necciai

Robert Necciai (he/him/his), University of Pittsburgh School of Law

As a Student Fellow at Neighborhood Legal Services Association, Robert will work closely with experienced attorneys and partners to connect more clients to custody legal services. His work will include establishing regular outreach information sessions to provide information on custody rights and responsibilities and helping with custody cases.

 

Photo of Hana Muslic
Photo of Hana Muslic

Hana Muslic (she/her/hers), DePaul University College of Law

Hosted by Southern Minnesota Regional Legal Services, Inc, Hana will focus on meeting the challenge of the increased number of housing and eviction matters that will come forth due to the end of the Minnesota Eviction Moratorium Phaseout. With only two housing attorneys available to meet this increasing demand for legal services at Southern Minnesota Regional Legal Services, Hana will help to directly serve clients in landlord-tenant and other housing matters.

 

Photo of Regan Richards
Photo of Regan Richards

Regan Richards (she/her/hers), George Washington University Law School

At Montana Legal Services Association, Regan will conduct intake interviews, provide supervised legal advice to tenants facing eviction, participate in landlord-tenant mediations, and help route clients for full representation, mediation, and other wrap-around services.

 

Photo of Lauren Rowell
Photo of Lauren Rowell

Lauren Rowell (she/her/hers), University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Lauren will work directly with attorneys at Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York on landlord-tenant and family law proceedings involving domestic violence to address problems faced by rural clients in accessing legal assistance and representation.

 

Photo of Gabriella Sayger
Photo of Gabriella Sayger

Gabriella Sayger (she/her/hers), Appalachian School of Law

Hosted by Legal Aid of West Virginia, Gabriella will help provide direct civil legal services focusing on stabilizing clients’ access to housing and economic stability for rural renters at risk of eviction. Gabriella will also provide targeted outreach and legal education for community partners and the public on legal issues.

 

Photo of Aaron Schaffer-Neitz
Photo of Aaron Schaffer-Neitz

Aaron Schaffer-Neitz (he/him/his), Stanford Law School

At Legal Aid Society of Mid-New York, Inc, Aaron will gain experience with all types of cases from agricultural workers across New York, including trafficking, wage theft, workplace health and safety, discrimination, and civil rights. His work will have a special emphasis on housing issues experienced by New York farmworkers living in employer-provided housing such as brown drinking water, mold, sewage backup, cracked windows, exposed wiring, overcrowded conditions, and a lack of heat during cold months.

 

Photo of Mary Sommerfeldt
Photo of Maryn Sommerfeldt

Maryn Sommerfeldt (she/her/hers), University of Oregon School of Law

Hosted by Utah Legal Services, Maryn will work closely with experienced attorneys to conduct outreach and serve clients in rural and frontier areas of Utah. She will help provide targeted outreach to underserved populations, organize a community education and outreach plan to assist with debt collection cases, and provide direct services to clients in debt collection cases.

 

Photo of Gabriel Spellberg
Photo of Gabriel Spellberg

Gabe Spellberg (he/him/his), Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology

At Colorado Legal Services, Gabe will work with the Migrant Farm Worker Division to meet the legal needs of farmworkers in the Western Slope region of Colorado. His work will focus on working conditions, wage issues, civil rights, sexual harassment, human trafficking, and immigration.

 

Photo of Autumn Westhoff
Photo of Autumn Westhoff

Autumn Westhoff (she/her/hers), University of Missouri School of Law

Autumn will help Legal Services of Eastern Missouri expand their outreach efforts and increase capacity by serving domestic violence victims living in rural northeastern Missouri. She will work with mentors to conduct intake screenings, interview clients, draft pleadings, manage dockets, appear in court, and assist with case closeout, primarily for domestic violence cases.

 

Photo of Ash Wilkie
Photo of Ash Wilkie

Ashley (Ash) Wilkie (she/her/hers), Michigan State University College of Law

Hosted by Michigan Indian Legal Services, Ash will assist staff with community outreach and planning on-site and virtual clinics. She will also attend three clinics in rural areas and draft estate planning documents, such as wills, powers of attorney, and patient advocate forms.

 

 

Visit here for more information about the Rural Summer Legal Corps.

Equal Justice Works is proud to introduce the 2022 class of Disaster Resilience Program Student Fellows. These eight law students will spend their summer working alongside Disaster Resilience Program Fellows in California, Louisiana, and New Mexico as they help communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters.

“Disasters can have a devastating impact on individuals and communities, and the legal needs that emerge following a disaster are complex and difficult to navigate alone,” said Linda Anderson Stanley, senior program manager at Equal Justice Works and director of the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division Disaster Legal Services Program. “We are proud to support these Student Fellows in their work to expand critical legal resources for families affected by disasters and their efforts to build more resilient communities.”

Through the Disaster Resilience Program, Student Fellows will gain exposure to disaster preparedness, response, and recovery legal work. They will help to provide civil legal services, engage in community education and advocacy efforts, and build capacity at their host organization.

Meet our Disaster Resilience Program Student Fellows and learn more about how they will be supporting a wide range of disaster-related legal issues, including housing, employment, immigration, accessibility, and health care needs.

Photo of Megan Brua
Photo of Megan Brua

Megan Brua (she/her/hers), University of Wisconsin Law School

At Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, Megan will work alongside 2021 Fellow Chris Kerrigan to help achieve justice for low-income individuals facing eviction or housing instability. This includes providing legal assistance, advocacy, community education, and resources to those who have experienced housing issues due to disasters or landlord neglect.

 

Photo of Emily Bruell
Photo of Emily Bruell

Emily Bruell, Stanford Law School

At New Mexico Immigrant Law Center, Emily will work with 2022 Fellows Taylor Noya, Sophia Genovese, and Anna Trillo on the Asylum and Detention team to provide legal aid to noncitizens in immigration detention and non-detained asylum seekers. Emily will also assist Fellows with asylum cases and conduct outreach at New Mexico’s detention centers.

 

Photo of Nora Hendricks
Photo of Nora Hendricks

Nora Hendricks (she/her/hers), Seattle University School of Law

Hosted by Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, Nora will work with 2022 Fellow Patrick Doell to provide on-site direct legal services at the Baton Rouge City Court via an eviction help desk. A city court eviction help desk will act as insulation for individuals against future increases in evictions due to disasters or other causes. They will also aid defendants who need legal representation in eviction cases. Together, Nora and Patrick will aid those who are experiencing issues with housing security due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Photo of Abigail Meibaum
Photo of Abigail Meibaum

Abigail Meibaum (she/her/hers), Washington University in Saint Louis School of Law

Abigail will focus on disaster-related advocacy and litigation with 2022 Fellow Skyler Williams at Southeast Louisiana Legal Services. There, Abigail will help provide access to sustainable housing and prevent evictions in Louisiana, which is currently facing an eviction crisis due to COVID-19. The region’s vulnerability to hurricanes requires a focus on overarching housing issues and providing know your rights training for community members, which Abigail will help provide.

 

Photo of Alondra Granados
Photo of Alondra Granados-Diaz

Alondra Granados-Diaz, University of New Mexico School of Law

Hosted by New Mexico Immigrant Law Center, Alondra will work alongside 2022 Fellow Sophia Genovese on the Asylum and Detention team to provide legal assistance to noncitizens in immigration detention and non-detained asylum seekers. Together, they hope to aid those affected by COVID-19’s effects on the immigration system, such as medical issues raised by the pandemic in immigration detention centers.

 

Photo of Desiree Robedeaux
Photo of Desiree Robedeaux

Desiree Robedeaux (she/her/hers), University of California, Hastings College of Law

At Disability Rights California, Desiree will work alongside 2021 Fellow Jordan Davis to address the legal needs of Californians with disabilities affected by wildfire disasters. Together, they will work to address Public Safety Power Shutoff events, housing displacement and accessibility issues, emergency transportation, and the negative health impacts of poor air quality, which all disproportionately affect people with access and functional needs.

 

Photo of Jonathan Thomas
Photo of Jonathan Thomas

Jonathan Thomas (he/him/his), Washington and Lee University School of Law

Hosted by Disability Rights Louisiana, Jonathan will work with 2021 Fellow Kate Thorstad to serve Louisianans with disabilities who were impacted by disasters such as the COVID-19 pandemic and Hurricane Ida. Together, they will work to mitigate barriers to critical programs, services, and housing.

 

Photo of Ernesto Villasenor
Photo of Ernesto Villaseñor

Ernesto Villaseñor, University of Baltimore School of Law

Ernesto will work with 2021 Fellow Jacob Zarefsky at Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles to provide legal aid and assistance to wildfire survivors throughout California. Together, they will work to conduct client outreach to disaster survivors, represent wildfire survivors, and engage with their peers in learning exercises.

Visit here for more information about Disaster Resilience Program.

The Disaster Resilience Program is currently funded by the Bigglesworth Family Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and individual contributions. 

We are proud to support these Student Fellows in their work to expand critical legal resources for families affected by disasters and their efforts to build more resilient communities.

Linda Anderson Stanley /
Equal Justice Works Senior Program Manager

Equal Justice Works, the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, today announced the recipients of the 2022 Regional Public Interest Award, recognizing eight law students for their exemplary commitment to public interest law and pro bono work.

“We are thrilled to announce the winners of our Regional Public Interest Award,” said Aoife Delargy Lowe, vice president of law school engagement and advocacy at Equal Justice Works. “These exemplary law students share our commitment to increasing access to justice and it is an honor to recognize their leadership and service on their campuses and beyond.”

We are thrilled to announce the winners of our Regional Public Interest Award. These exemplary law students share our commitment to increasing access to justice and it is an honor to recognize their leadership and service on their campuses and beyond.

Aoife Delargy Lowe /
Equal Justice Works Vice President of Law School Engagement & Advocacy

These eight law students were selected by the Equal Justice Works National Advisory Committee for providing outstanding service through law clinics, volunteer work, internships, extracurricular projects, and other initiatives. These award winners will receive a commemorative plaque and a monetary reward.

2022 RPIA Winners
Photo of the 2022 Regional Public Interest Award Winners. Top row (L-R): Aranda Stathers, Christopher Kloth, Darcy Guio, Claire Comey. Bottom row (L-R): Victoria Bonds, Grace Wynelle Thomas, Maggie Belcher, Lauren Cook.

“I have and will continue to devote my life to public service and the advancement of others,” said Aranda Stathers, a second-year law student at Pennsylvania State University Dickinson Law. “Life has afforded me many opportunities to travel and advance my education. I believe it is my duty to leverage my privilege to benefit others, and I will continue to do so long after I graduate from law school.”

Below is the list of this year’s Regional Public Interest Award recipients:

  • Christopher Kloth
    Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law
    Gulf Region
  • Lauren Cook
    Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law at Campbell University
    South Region
  • Maggie Belcher
    Michigan State University College of Law
    Midwest Region
  • Grace Wynelle Thomas
    University of Texas School of Law
    Southwest Region
  • Aranda Stathers
    Pennsylvania State University Dickinson Law
    Mid-Atlantic Region
  • Claire Comey
    Washington University in Saint Louis School of Law
    Mountain Region
  • Victoria Bonds
    Loyola Law School Los Angeles
    Pacific Region
  • Darcy Guio
    Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University
    Northeast Region

Equal Justice Works offers many opportunities for law students to serve the public interest law community on their campuses and nationwide. Visit here for more information.

Forty law students will spend their summer helping improve access to justice for people living in rural communities.

WASHINGTON, D.C., MAY 25, 2022—Equal Justice Works, the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, and the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), the nation’s single largest funder of civil legal aid for low-income Americans, today announced the selection of 40 law students for the Rural Summer Legal Corps (RSLC).

“It is inspiring to see the number of law students who wish to make a meaningful difference in rural communities where civil legal aid is difficult to find,” said David Stern, executive director at Equal Justice Works. “We look forward to seeing the collective impact this talented group of students will have during their summer of service.”

It is inspiring to see the number of law students who wish to make a meaningful difference in rural communities where civil legal aid is difficult to find.

David Stern /
Equal Justice Works Executive Director

RSLC is a partnership between Equal Justice Works and LSC that supports law students serving rural communities each summer. Program participants, called Student Fellows, spend eight to ten weeks hosted by LSC-funded civil legal aid organizations, where they help address challenges facing rural communities.

The 2022 class of Rural Summer Legal Corps Fellows includes 40 students from 36 law schools who will work at 37 LSC-funded civil legal aid organizations across the United States and its territories, providing critical legal assistance to people in rural areas. Through the program, Student Fellows have the opportunity to provide direct legal services, engage in community outreach and education, and build capacity at the organizations where they are hosted.

“The Rural Summer Legal Corps offers law students direct exposure to a potential career and supports civil legal aid organizations working tirelessly to meet the needs of their communities,” said LSC President Ron Flagg. “The shortage of lawyers in rural areas is well documented, and Fellows’ service this summer during the COVID-19 health crisis is particularly important as the numbers of people eligible for LSC-funded services and the legal needs of Americans living in poverty have been surging.”

The Rural Summer Legal Corps offers law students direct exposure to a potential career and supports civil legal aid organizations working tirelessly to meet the needs of their communities.

Ron Flagg /
LSC President

This year’s class of RSLC Student Fellows will take on projects that address a range of access-to-justice issues. Some of these projects include:

  • Dayleen Chery and Matthew Gulick will support their host organization, Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc., in the areas of farmworkers rights and environmental justice. Dayleen, a student at Southern University Law Center, will work on a variety of employment law matters affecting migrant and seasonal agricultural workers; and Matthew, a student at Lewis & Clark Law School, will help ensure rural communities are not overburdened by air and water pollution and have access to safe drinking water.
  • Elise Baroni will join “Beyond Opioids—Breaking Legal Barriers for Families in Recovery,” a collaborative project among legal aid programs in Arkansas that supports people impacted by the opioid crisis and other substance use disorders. Elise, a student at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Leflar Law Center, will be hosted by Legal Aid of Arkansas.
  • Christopher Irsfeld will support his host organization, California Rural Legal Assistance, in addressing legal issues affecting rural transgender and gender-non-conforming Californians, as well as investigating potential harassment and discrimination claims. Christopher is a law student at New York University School of Law.

Launched in 2016, RSLC Student Fellows have helped increase access to justice for thousands of individuals living in rural communities. In 2021, law students in the program collectively contributed 10,746 hours to help rural communities, with 4,492 hours spent on direct legal services. These Student Fellows also participated in 154 outreach events, created or expanded more than 170 collaborations with community partners, and provided legal information to more than 900 individuals.

To learn more about the Rural Summer Legal Corps, visit here.

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About Equal Justice Works

Equal Justice Works is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that creates opportunities for lawyers to transform their passion for equal justice into a lifelong commitment to public service. As the nation’s largest facilitator of opportunities in public interest law, Equal Justice Works brings together an extensive network of law students, lawyers, nonprofit legal aid organizations, and supporters to promote public service and inspire a lifelong commitment to equal justice.

About Legal Services Corporation
Legal Services Corporation (LSC) is an independent nonprofit established by Congress in 1974 to provide financial support for civil legal aid to low-income Americans. The Corporation currently provides funding to 132 independent nonprofit legal aid organizations in every state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Visit www.lsc.gov for more information.

Contact:
Heena Patel
Marketing & Communications Director
Email: [email protected]

Photo of Vivian Martinez

Equal Justice Works is proud to announce that Vivian Martinez has joined the organization’s board of directors as its newest member. Vivian is a second-year law student and Public Interest Scholar at LMU Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

“Equal Justice Works was founded by law students, and they are still core to our mission.  We provide public interest opportunities, training, and educational debt assistance to enable these students to pursue their public interest dreams while in law school and beyond,” said David Stern, executive director at Equal Justice Works. “We are honored to welcome Vivian to the Board. She is an accomplished young leader whose passion for public interest law and commitment to serving her community make her a perfect addition to our Board of Directors.”

At LMU Loyola Law School, Vivian stays active on campus by volunteering at the Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic, where she provides direct representation to individuals who are unable to obtain immigration legal services elsewhere. At the Clinic, Vivian also collaborates with other law students on advocacy projects to advance the rights of immigrant communities of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights. In addition to her immigration advocacy work, Vivian is a member of La Raza de Loyola and the Disability Law Society at her school.

“As the first in my family to attend law school, I feel an enormous responsibility to channel my family’s strength as new Americans into action of my own,” said Vivian. “I am thrilled to grow the momentum of the Equal Justice Works mission and uplift diversity in the legal field for continuing generations of QTBIPOC law students and lawyers. It is my great privilege to contribute to the vision of advancing equal access to justice alongside the dedicated board and passionate staff at Equal Justice Works.”

I am thrilled to grow the momentum of the Equal Justice Works mission and uplift diversity in the legal field for continuing generations of QTBIPOC law students and lawyers.

Vivian Martinez /
Equal Justice Works Board Member

Vivian’s passion for public interest law extends beyond campus. Following her first year of law school, Vivian helped to provide critical legal services for people living in rural communities as part of the Rural Summer Legal Corps, a partnership between Equal Justice Works and the Legal Services Corporation that supports law students in serving rural communities each summer. During her Student Fellowship, Vivian was hosted at California Rural Legal Assistance, where she assisted with employment and immigration matters for LGBTQ+ rural communities in the Central Coast and Central Valley.

“My experience as an RSLC Student Fellow was fundamental to my journey in public interest law,” said Vivian. “The LGBTQ+ Program provided me with the training and mentorship necessary for a strong foundation in inclusive and affirming client representation. I gained invaluable skills to strengthen collaboration between clients and their legal team. The partnership between Equal Justice Works and California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc., made my commitment to those most marginalized possible and allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of our legal system and its impact on LGBTQ+ rural communities.”

After law school, Vivian plans to pursue a career in public service where she can draw on her experience in holistic services to uplift immigrant communities.

Visit here to view a full list of Equal Justice Works Board of Directors.

Each year, disasters strike communities around the country, creating an ongoing cycle of impact and recovery. As a result of this cycle, inequality is further rooted in communities that are impacted by disaster. Moreover, disasters often disproportionately affect low-income communities and communities of color.

In 2020, Equal Justice Works launched the Disaster Resilience Program to respond to the critical need for legal assistance before, during, and after disasters. Through the Disaster Resilience Program, Equal Justice Works mobilizes cohorts of lawyers and law students to provide free civil legal aid in disaster-prone areas and work to rebuild lives, stabilize communities, and create resilience to future disasters.

Last summer, 6 law students spent eight to ten weeks working alongside Equal Justice Works Fellows in the Disaster Resilience Program, helping to provide legal aid, engage in community outreach and education in disaster resilience.

2021 DRP By The Numbers Image

During their summer of service, Student Fellows in the Disaster Resilience Program collectively contributed 1,589 hours that included

  • 741 hours on research and developing resources;
  • 423 hours on client cases, client intake, and legal clinics; and
  • 115 hours on outreach and educational activities.

“The best part of my experience at Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida was that I never felt like a day was wasted,” said Kyla Howard, a third-year law student at New England Law and a 2021 Disaster Resilience Program Student Fellow, “I could see how every project was effective for either the firm or the community. All my trainings and research came full circle when I got to use what I had learned to get into the community and help local tenants during the COVID-19 disaster.”

The best part of my experience at Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida was that I never felt like a day was wasted.

Kyla Howard /
2021 Student Fellow
Disaster Resilience Program

Among their many accomplishments this summer, Student Fellows assisted on research projects, contributed to a national disaster guidebook, prepped legal documents, drafted briefs for court, and developed tools to manage the COVID-19 eviction moratoriums. As a result of their efforts, 3,556 individuals received informal legal assistance!

One of the top highlights of the Disaster Resilience Program this summer occurred at Catholic Charities of Galveston-Houston, where Andra Lehotay de León, a second year student at Northeastern University School of Law and a 2021 Disaster Resilience Program Student Fellow worked alongside Equal Justice Works Fellow Maria Vazquez to help a young family facing deportation. The father of the family was faced with a 10-year ban from obtaining legal status in the United States due to his initial unlawful entry. Andra and Maria fought the ban with a waiver and were able to get the father approved for a visa petition through his marriage.

“Through this opportunity, I learned of the importance of disaster resilience-informed advocacy for immigrant clients,” said Andra. “…I am particularly interested in continuing my work in immigration law, specifically within communities frequently impacted by natural disasters.”

Through this opportunity, I learned of the importance of disaster resilience-informed advocacy for immigrant clients.

Andra Lehotay de León /
2021 Student Fellow
Disaster Resilience Program

Despite the challenge of several Student Fellows working remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 Disaster Resilience Program were able to gain valuable legal experience and make meaningful contributions in the communities they served. Following their summer of service, all the Student Fellows felt that their legal knowledge and interest in serving communities affected by disasters had significantly increased due to their experience in the program.

If you are interested in helping communities prepare for and recover from disasters, apply to the Disaster Resilience Program by 11:59 p.m. ET on February 14, 2022. For more information about program eligibility and requirements, please visit here.

Rural areas in the United States have long been faced with a lack of accessible civil legal aid. Residents in rural communities are often forced to travel great distances to find much-needed legal assistance. Since 2016, Equal Justice Works has worked with Legal Services Corporation (LSC) to bring unique opportunities for law students to improve access to justice in rural areas through the Rural Summer Legal Corps (RSLC).

Last summer, Student Fellows in the RSLC spent eight to ten weeks helping to provide direct legal services and engaging in community outreach and education. Selected from 460 applications, the 2021 class of RSLC Student Fellows included 35 Student Fellows who served at 32 LSC-funded civil legal organizations across the country. During their summer of service, Student Fellows collectively contributed 10,746 hours to help rural communities attain access to legal aid, with 4,492 hours spent on direct legal services! Their efforts helped a total of 1,296 individuals, and they assisted on 795 legal cases.

“I felt like I was making a meaningful difference in the lives of my clients,” said Jessica Stipek, a second-year law student at the University of Oregon School of Law and 2021 RSLC Student Fellow. “I also appreciate that I got to work on a wide range of cases and with different attorneys.”

I felt like I was making a meaningful difference in the lives of my clients. I also appreciate that I got to work on a wide range of cases and with different attorneys.

Jessica Stipek /
2021 Student Fellow
Rural Summer Legal Corps

Student Fellows provided legal aid in a wide variety of issues, such as housing matters, COVID-19, economic matters, the opioid crisis, and disaster relief. They also served a diverse client base that included agricultural workers, victims of domestic violence, minors, veterans, military members, and elderly clients. Of the 34 RSLC participants surveyed, 80% said that their experiences throughout the Fellowship increased their interest in working with similar client bases in the future.

Additionally, the 2021 RSLC class of Student Fellows participated in 154 outreach events and created or expanded more than 170 collaborations with community partnerships. These efforts resulted in 944 individuals receiving informational legal services, such as resource materials, Know Your Rights trainings, and fact sheets.

“I was able to directly serve clients in filing various forms of post-conviction relief,” said Justin Small, a third-year student at Loyola Law School Los Angeles and 2021 RSLC Student Fellow. “It was actually being able to talk to clients and help them with their legal issues that I think was the most impactful. I also got to develop some of my ideas around client advocacy.”

Despite the challenge of several Student Fellows working remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 RSLC Student Fellows were still about to explore their passion for service and foster positive outcomes for the clients they served. Following their summer of service, 97% of Student Fellows felt that their legal knowledge had increased from their Fellowships, and 85% said participating in the RSLC had increased their passion for public interest law.

“It afforded me the opportunity to get real legal aid experience and confirm that I am invested in pursuing a career in public interest law,” said Justin.

[RSLC] afforded me the opportunity to get real legal aid experience and confirm that I am invested in pursuing a career in public interest law.

Justin Small /
2021 Student Fellow
Rural Summer Legal Corps

For more information about the Rural Summer Legal Corps, such as program eligibility and requirements, please visit here. To become a 2022 Student Fellow, apply by 11:59 p.m. ET on February 14, 2022.